Valley Heart & Vascular Institute - BAV Image Library
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BAV Image Library

Bicuspid Aortic Valves (BAVs) come in a variety of shapes and configurations. BAV with only 2 leaflets ('Type 0') occur only around 10% of the time. On the other hand, 'Type I' valves are exceedingly common (85-90% of all BAVs), and run the spectrum from very obvious fusion of 2 of the 3 valve leaflets, or minimal degrees of leaflet fusion. 'Type 2' BAVs have fusion among all 3 aortic valve leaflets and also run the spectrum, with extensively fused leaflets appearing 'unicuspid' rather than bicuspid, or with minimal fusion, which like most BAVs looks like a normal tri-leaflet valve at first glance. Valve sub-typing ('phenotypes') are done by naming the leaflets that are fused (R, right; L, left; N, non-coronary valve leaflet).

Quadricuspid Aortic Valves (QAVs) are quite rare, and typically also come with valve leaflet fusion, usually giving a bicuspid appearance.

Unicuspid aortic valves (UAVs) usually present with severe aortic stenosis, however, with specialty imaging, we can also detect subtle forms of UAV with limited degrees of leaflet fusion at all 3 commissures.

Type I, R/L BAV, very limited fusion
Type I, R/L BAV, very limited fusion

Type I, R/L BAV, very limited fusion

QAV with valve closed

QAV with valve open

Type I, R/L BAV, extensive fusion

Type I, R/L BAV, extensive fusion

Type I, R/N BAV, very limited fusion


Type I, R/N BAV, very limited fusion

Type I, R/L BAV, heavily fused raphe, severe calcific aortic stenosis
Type II BAV with very limited fusion at RL and LN
Limited fusion at R/L commissure
Limited fusion at L/N commissure
Unicuspid Aortic Valve: Limited fusion at all 3 commissures
R/L commissure
L/N commissure
R/N commissure
Type II BAV
Type I RL BAV significant leaflet fusion
 


For more information, contact Leanne Scaglione, R.N., MSN, APN-BC, Coordinator for the Thoracic Aneurysm Surveillance Program, at 201-447-8398.

 
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